A Critical Incident Reflection from the Chicken Coop

Critical incidents are occurrences that let us see, with new eyes, some aspect of what we do. The critical incident in question is the outbreak of bird flu this winter, and whilst at time of writing we seem to be emerging, to some degree, from the strict prevention orders, it has given me a little time to reflect on what has just happened.

Reflection is something I’ve been taught and encouraged to do whilst studying for a Masters however I’ve recently found it useful to apply to the poultry breeding part of my life.

You simply ask yourself three questions, what happened, so what and now what.

What happened? – Europe, including the UK, was hit by bird flu over the winter of 2016/17

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So what? – It resulted in a prevention order being implemented in December 2016, extended, and then extended with modification possibly until April 2017. This required enhanced biosecurity measures to be applied and birds to be kept indoors or in covered runs to minimise the risk of contact with infected wild birds. Not a simple task for a poultry keeping regime that relies on a free range, outdoor livestock.20170221_084210

 

The winters also seem to be increasingly wild and unpredictable in terms of their weather and it is safe to say that a husbandry technique that is built around free range and pastured rearing of poultry doesn’t work in gale force weather.

 

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Now what? – In the short term my breeding programme is at best delayed, at worst abandoned for the 2017 season. My maintenance costs for the winter have escalated and I have limited stock available for the markets and auctions; not that there have been any to sell through due to restrictions on poultry gatherings, consequently my income from poultry for the year will be hit.

In the longer term is this really a one off. or will next winter result in the same problem or possibly the arrival of H5N9? I will assume that prevention orders will the occur in future years, and as it seems that “lock downs” are the easiest way for the authorities to minimise the risk of bird flu impacting poultry, then I will spend the summer months adjusting my husbandry regime such that I can fully free range in the summer (should there be no prevention orders in place), and I can contain the stock under cover during the winter months, should bird flu and the associated prevention orders reoccur.

It will be a different way of working and I suspect there will be more to consider than just the housing, however I’m not convinced that this is the last we will see of these types of prevention measures that we backyarders and smallholders have had to implement, so I encourage you all to look back and reflect in readiness for the next time it happens.

A spot of poultry podcasting with Alys Fowler and Jane Perrone for The Guardian

If you follow me on twitter or have read one of my recent blogs then you might have seen I was podcasting about poultry with two lovely folks who I’m chuffed to include amongst my friends, Alys Fowler and Jane Perrone from the The Guardians #sowgrowrepeat  . Have a listen (and hear me do a chicken impression!) and see why the only conclusion is chickens are the star pets of the garden …. although my old knuckle-head collie, Mick, does get a mention

Alys Fowler and Jane Perrone discuss the particulars of pets in gardens | Life and style | The Guardian.

Radio 2, Podcasting and Planning

It’s been an interesting past 7 days or so that involved being invited on to Simon Mayo’s Radio 2 Drivetime to explain another listeners three word Wednesday of “washing show chickens” to podcasting about pet poultry with Alys Fowler and Jane Perrone.

Yours truly caught rolling on Ellesmere green

Yours truly caught rolling on Ellesmere green

In between I’ve played a few games of Crown Green Bowls with this being my second season after an almost 30 year break (yup, that game you thought was the the last refuge of old men was a sport I played in my mid teens) plus I’ve also set my last batch of hatching for the year.

This might seem a little early to be switching off the incubators but breeding any livestock is about planning. The eggs I set this last weekend will hatch mid June. Extrapolate that out and you have the pullets reaching 18 weeks by the end of October which means with a bit of luck some if not all might just start laying before the winter sets in. If not then they will obviously kick off in the spring but they will be expensive mouths to feed and maintain over the winter months.

Planning can be key, getting the plan wrong can be costly. Good luck to those who have hatched up this year and may your pullets be productive!

 

Chicken & Egg by Andy Cawthray and James Hermes | The Womens Room

The first review of the new book and hopefully the first of many positive ones too 🙂

Chicken & Egg by Andy Cawthray and James Hermes | The Womens Room.

Chicken & Egg – My new book has arrived

Yesterday’s post delivery saw the arrival (pre-release) of my new book. This time I teamed up with American poultry specialist and associate professor James Hermes to create a book that looked specifically at eggs and egg laying breeds.Cover

Just as with “The chicken; a natural history” Ivy Press have created another striking book which is enhanced significantly by the fantastic free flowing artwork of illustrator Kate Osborne. It’s been an absolute pleasure to work with both James and Kate, albeit it a completely ‘virtual’ collaboration, and I hope they are both as pleased with the result as I am.

If you have been involved in writing a reference book then, unless you are self-publishing, it can be not unlike writing for a magazine. You put the words together, you suggest images and captions, you edit and amend gallies and mock ups, but in the end you don’t really know what the final product looks like until you have it in your hand. Ivy Press described themselves as ‘makers of beautiful books’ which, inspite my being an author of two of their books, I can honestly say they do.

I wonder what my third title might be about…. Chickens perhaps? Oh go on then… 🙂

 

Blatant Book Plug – Chicken & Egg: An Egg-Centric Guide To Raising Poultry

Well it’s my blog, so why not plug my new title due out in the Spring of 2015…..?

The title might sound a little corny however the focus of the book is in fact “eggs”. The origins and science of eggs along with the ways to get the best out the breeds you choose with particular emphasis on a number of the key laying pure breeds, all beautiful illustrated in the loose water colour style of that exceptional artist, Kate Osbourne . I’ve yet to see the finished product but if it’s anything like the previous title I worked on with Ivy Press then it will be exceptional and well worth owning…. and I’m not just saying that because I wrote it, but because the other book genuinely is a cracker 😉

New title due out in Feb 2015

New title due out in Feb 2015

A brief interlude….

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I write, in fact looking back over the decade of magazine, newspaper and book contributions I seem to write quite a bit. I’m not sure quite how many words I’ve written but each piece always seems to be a relatively short or succinct journey. Even the book I was involved with last year was broken down into sections that at times it felt like I was penning a series for a magazine as opposed to writing a substantial chapter of a book.

Then there was the mini guide I did for Your Chickens, again it was a segmented delivery that could well have been run in a periodical publication. That’s the beauty I guess of feature writer or columnist versus that of being an author. In fact it’s not until you sit down with an idea, the idea you just pitched successfully to a publisher, that you realise the difference.

Why this little blogette? Well today I have sat in front of me the 40,000 word final draft manuscript of a book, this time though I’m the sole author and despite the invention of computers and word processing, I still feel a little like Samuel Johnson with the first ever Dictionary, wondering if I’ve covered all that I wanted to cover….

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